Education

Gregori High water is good again, Modesto City Schools says

Water fountains across the Gregori High School campus were covered after the water tested high for lead in the Stanislaus County community of Salida last August. Two days later, retesting showed the water was OK.
Water fountains across the Gregori High School campus were covered after the water tested high for lead in the Stanislaus County community of Salida last August. Two days later, retesting showed the water was OK. aalfaro@modbee.com

Come on in, Gregori students and staff, the water’s fine.

That’s the message from Modesto City Schools after the Salida campus’s water supply was retested because it had elevated levels of lead. The initial test of water collected July 5 from 10 locations at the school found that in four samples, lead was above the acceptable level of 15 micrograms per liter, the district said.

When those results came in, Modesto City Schools last Tuesday made water campuswide off-limits for drinking and cooking. Bottled water was provided in its place.

Samples from the same 10 collection sources were taken again Thursday, the district said in an announcement posted on its website. Test results came back Friday and showed all 10 samples were within acceptable levels. The required tests also check for copper levels, which neither time were unacceptable.

Because the school is on its own well, not part of the public water supply, testing for lead and copper has been required every three years, Associate Superintendent Tim Zearley said. “Following these test results, we are required to monitor lead and copper levels every six months for one year, but will voluntarily continue the twice-yearly testing for at least two years,” the district announcement said.

“We believe the difference in the testing results comes from the timing of the samplings. The July 5, 2018, sampling was taken during a time of minimal student and staff demand on the water system, causing water to remain stagnant. The August 23, 2018, sampling was taken during normal student and staff demands on the water system.”

The 80-acre campus, which opened in 2010, was built on agricultural land beyond the reach of existing water or sewer services.

When the school population returned to campus Monday morning, all was back to normal. Of the drinking fountains, Zearley said in the 6 a.m. hour, “They are right now being prepped to be turned back, on for use.”

Related stories from Modesto Bee

  Comments