High School Sports

Golden Valley guard Delia Moore suffers another torn ACL

Golden Valley sophomore Delia Moore (11) pushes the ball up the court during a game against Franklin in the first round of the CIF Sac-Joaquin Section Division 1 Playoffs at Golden Valley High School in Merced, Calif., Tuesday, Feb. 23, 2016. The Cougars beat the Wildcats 68-52.
Golden Valley sophomore Delia Moore (11) pushes the ball up the court during a game against Franklin in the first round of the CIF Sac-Joaquin Section Division 1 Playoffs at Golden Valley High School in Merced, Calif., Tuesday, Feb. 23, 2016. The Cougars beat the Wildcats 68-52. akuhn@mercedsunstar.com

Golden Valley High School point guard Delia Moore had surgery to repair a torn ACL in her left knee for the second time in a little more than a year.

The injury occurred during a Modesto Magic practice, Golden Valley girls basketball coach Matt Thissen said.

She rehabbed like crazy and went through physical therapy. You don’t want to see any kid go through that. But if someone can handle it, this young lady can do it.

Matt Thissen, Golden Valley girls basketball coach, on sophomore Delia Moore’s knee injury

Moore, who had surgery the week of Easter, is the younger sister of former Modesto Christian standouts Valerie and Stephanie Moore. Valerie recently finished her senior season at Saint Mary’s College in Moraga, while Stephanie closed her prep career at Golden Valley as a two-time Central California Conference MVP.

Delia is the heir apparent, a sophomore who shares the same genetic makeup and thirst for the sport.

“They are the same kid. The same motor. The same work ethic,” Thissen said of Stephanie and Delia. “They really are cut from the same mold. I feel bad that she has to go through this again.”

Delia Moore initially tore her ACL in a meaningless nonconference game Feb. 16, 2015. With one contact remaining and two weeks between the regular season and start of the Sac-Joaquin Section playoffs, Thissen scheduled a tune-up with Riverbank, then the Trans-Valley League champion.

The game proved costly. Golden Valley won handily 72-18, but Moore’s injury set her back nearly a calendar year. She was injured on an uncontested layup about five minutes into the game. Her left knee buckled upon launch.

15 The number of points scored by Golden Valley sophomore guard Delia Moore in a first-round playoff win, also her first start of the season.

“She wasn’t touched,” Thissen said.

Thissen worked the sophomore back into the lineup slowly this season, budgeting her minutes as the Cougars’ chased a second consecutive conference crown. Moore began the season logging two minutes per quarter.

She made her first start in a 68-52 victory over Franklin-Elk Grove in the first round of the Division I playoffs and responded with 15 points, four rebounds and four assists. She was 3 of 4 on three-point attempts as the Cougars advanced to the quarterfinal round for the first time since 2006.

“The win was very exciting,” she told the Merced Sun-Star. “It was something we all were really hoping for since Golden Valley hasn’t won a playoff game in a really long time.”

Moore’s first game with extended minutes was a season-ending 44-41 defeat to Folsom in the quarterfinals.

“She rehabbed like crazy and went through physical therapy. You don’t want to see any kid go through that,” Thissen said, “but if someone can handle it, this young lady can do it.”

She has big plans.

Stephanie Moore, Golden Valley senior guard, on her sister Delia Moore’s comeback from second ACL surgery

Thissen doesn’t believe the injury will scare Moore away from the floor. Her sister, Stephanie, confirmed she’s already in the weight room and “can do more push-ups than me.”

“She has big plans,” Stephanie said.

While Thissen didn’t elaborate on her rehab schedule, he said his team is better with the ball in Delia’s hands.

“You can’t tell that kid she can’t play anymore,” he said. “There’s just no way. If we had her at 90 percent, with all our posts coming back, we would have a really good chance at winning again.

“But if we don’t … it might be too much to overcome.”

James Burns: 209-578-2150, @jburns1980

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