California

Kaepernick observes protest anniversary: ‘The movement has always lived with the people!’

Taking a knee: How Colin Kaepernick started an NFL movement

It all started with sitting down during the anthem, which no one noticed at first. Here's how quarterback Colin Kaepernick's anthem protest turned into a pivotal movement for the NFL and its players.
Up Next
It all started with sitting down during the anthem, which no one noticed at first. Here's how quarterback Colin Kaepernick's anthem protest turned into a pivotal movement for the NFL and its players.

On Thursday, former 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick observed a personal anniversary.

“Today marks the three-year anniversary of the first time I protested systemic oppression,” Kaepernick wrote on Twitter. “I continue to work and stand with the people in our fight for liberation, despite those who are trying to erase the movement! The movement has always lived with the people!”

Kaepernick’s tweet also contained a two-minute video depicting past incidents of police violence intersected with media clippings of the protest activity and Kaepernick and other African American people speaking out against racial injustice.

Kaepernick in 2016 began kneeling during the national anthem at NFL games as a protest against mistreatment of minorities. The former quarterback who once led his team to the Super Bowl has been a free agent since the 2016-17 season ended.

He filed a lawsuit against the NFL accusing teams of colluding to prevent him from returning to the league, and reportedly received several million dollars in a settlement.

Kaepernick is hoping to play again soon. He recently tweeted a video showcasing his readiness to return to the field after nearly three years away.

“Colin has always been prepared to compete at the highest level and is in the best shape of his life,” a person close to Kaepernick told the Associated Press recently.

One person who’s skeptical of Kaepernick’s return? President Donald J. Trump, who has feuded with the quarterback in the past, including calling him a “son of a b----” at a rally in 2017.

“Only if he’s good enough. I know the owners, I know Bob Kraft. They will do anything they can to win games,” Trump said in a recent press conference, according to the AP.

Related stories from Modesto Bee

Andrew Sheeler covers California’s unique political climate for McClatchy. He has covered crime and politics from Interior Alaska to North Dakota’s oil patch to the rugged coast of southern Oregon. He attended the University of Alaska Fairbanks.
  Comments