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Turlock resident makes top turkey sandwich

Chris Lewis of Turlock won a turkey sandwich contest sponsored by Foster Farms, which processes the meat in Turlock and has just launched its first premium lunchmeat. The sandwich is made on whole-wheat bread and includes turkey, avocado, tomatoes, red bell peppers, sriracha mayonnaise, cilantro, lettuce and a homemade Thai peanut sauce.
Chris Lewis of Turlock won a turkey sandwich contest sponsored by Foster Farms, which processes the meat in Turlock and has just launched its first premium lunchmeat. The sandwich is made on whole-wheat bread and includes turkey, avocado, tomatoes, red bell peppers, sriracha mayonnaise, cilantro, lettuce and a homemade Thai peanut sauce. Foster Farms

Chris Lewis added flavors of Thailand to turkey from Turlock to win a sandwich contest sponsored by Foster Farms.

His entry won the $4,000 grand prize in a contest that was part of the launch of the company’s first premium turkey lunchmeat. It is low in fat and sodium and preserved without nitrites.

Lewis lives in Turlock, where Foster Farms processes its turkey, and works as an evidence technician for the Modesto Police Department. He said he had help on the sandwich idea from his wife, Natalie, who likes Thai spices.

“We were just playing around to see what works,” he said.

That turned out to be whole-wheat bread filled with turkey, avocado, tomatoes, lettuce, red bell peppers, sriracha mayonnaise and cilantro. Lewis then drizzled on a Thai sauce he made with peanut butter, sesame oil, soy sauce, brown sugar and water.

“This sandwich is heaven on earth!” said Kim Demmon, one of five food and lifestyle bloggers who judged the entries. “The perfect blend of my favorite cuisine with the traditional turkey sandwich makes this sandwich a welcome surprise.”

Entries in the contest, dubbed “Don’t Call Me Basic,” had to use the new lunchmeat. It is sold under the Foster Farms All Natural Sliced Turkey label.


Elsewhere on the Farm Beat:

Farm labor activists are celebrating the 50th anniversary of a grape strike and boycott that was one of the early milestones for the movement.

United Farm Workers is holding a Sept. 26 event at its Kern County headquarters to honor people who took part in the 1965 actions involving wine and table grapes.

It will be from 9 a.m at 5 p.m. at Forty Acres, 30168 Garces Highway, near Delano. For more information, go to www.delanograpestrike.org.

The Delano event will include recognition of Filipino farmworkers whose role in the movement is not as well-known as Mexican leaders. Their contributions also have been documented on radio and online by KQED’s California Report, available at www.californiafoodways.com.

“These two groups that had been kept apart for so long, coming together, that is the power in the Delano Grape Strike,” Dawn Mabalon, a professor of history at San Francisco State University, told the station.

She also noted a 1939 strike by Filipino workers near Stockton that was especially well-timed: They refused on Good Friday to pick asparagus bound for Easter dinner tables, and growers quickly relented.

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