A juvenile salmon is removed from the stomach of a striped bass during a study on whether predation by the non-native bass is interfering with efforts to protect the native salmon. The photo was taken on the Tuolumne River near Waterford, Calif., on May 2, 2012. The Modesto and Turlock irrigation districts, which use the river, argue that controlling predators would be preferable to requiring them to release more water into the river for salmon.
A juvenile salmon is removed from the stomach of a striped bass during a study on whether predation by the non-native bass is interfering with efforts to protect the native salmon. The photo was taken on the Tuolumne River near Waterford, Calif., on May 2, 2012. The Modesto and Turlock irrigation districts, which use the river, argue that controlling predators would be preferable to requiring them to release more water into the river for salmon. Fishbio
A juvenile salmon is removed from the stomach of a striped bass during a study on whether predation by the non-native bass is interfering with efforts to protect the native salmon. The photo was taken on the Tuolumne River near Waterford, Calif., on May 2, 2012. The Modesto and Turlock irrigation districts, which use the river, argue that controlling predators would be preferable to requiring them to release more water into the river for salmon. Fishbio

Farm Beat: Salmon predation issue has new twists

June 17, 2016 4:58 PM