Sports

Raiders upended

Oakland Raiders quarterback Daunte Culpepper is tackled for a loss by Kansas City Chiefs defensive end Tamba Hali (91) and linebacker Derrick Johnson (55) in the fourth quarter. The Chiefs defeated the Raiders 12-10 at McAfee Coliseum in Oakland, California on Sunday October 21, 2007.
Oakland Raiders quarterback Daunte Culpepper is tackled for a loss by Kansas City Chiefs defensive end Tamba Hali (91) and linebacker Derrick Johnson (55) in the fourth quarter. The Chiefs defeated the Raiders 12-10 at McAfee Coliseum in Oakland, California on Sunday October 21, 2007.

OAKLAND -- It's easy to nitpick after a two-point loss.

And it starts with first-year Raiders coach Lane Kiffin's decision to go for a first down on fourth-and-one from the Chiefs' 17 instead of attempting a field goal in the second quarter.

LaMont Jordan was stopped for no gain with 5:58 left in the half and the Raiders eventually lost, 12-10, to the Kansas City Chiefs, Sunday at McAfee Coliseum.

Larry Johnson scored the go-ahead touchdown on a 1-yard run early in the fourth quarter and Jarrad Page had another clinching interception in the final minute to seal the Raiders' second consecutive loss and 17th in a row against an AFC West opponent.

It was also the Raiders ninth consecutive loss to the Chiefs, their longest losing streak against a single opponent.

Page, an Oakland native and Buccaneers fan who grew up cheering against the Raiders, also ended a comeback attempt by his hometown team a year ago when he intercepted a pass in the end zone from Aaron Brooks in the final minute of a 17-13 win.

Jordan put the scrutinized failed fourth down on himself, not Kiffin.

At 5-foot-10, 230 pounds, he said he should be able to get a yard without any blocking.

"It's one of those things where as a player you look back and say to yourself '... wish we would have kicked a field goal,' " Jordan said while clarifying he wasn't being critical. "It's one of those things where if you don't get the first down, you don't get points out of the drive, Kiff looks like a bad coach."

Kiffin's confidence in an offense that has struggled the last two weeks and a defense that hadn't played up to par season won over several Raiders.

Kiffin doesn't believe in settling for field goals and his decision proved that.

"I don't want to speak for anybody else but I think the attitude that they've brought here from Day 1, we would look at him different if he doesn't go for that," said receiver Mike Williams.

"If he doesn't go for it on fourth down we look at him like he kind of doubts us."

Kiffin wanted to spark an offense that has two touchdowns in its last two games. And with defense playing its best game of the season, Kiffin thought it was worth the risk.

"I'd do the same thing again," Kiffin said. "I believe in our players."

Kiffin had reason to believe in the defense. After allowing teams to rush for a league-worst 5.6 yards a carry, the Raiders held the Chiefs to 126 yards on 32 carries. That's about 3.9 yards a carry.

The Raiders' offense? It didn't score in the first half for the third time in six games. The Raiders ran for 55 yards in 24 carries and their receivers dropped passes or couldn't get open when Daunte Culpepper had time to throw.

The Chiefs (4-3) took the lead, 12-7, on a one-yard run by Johnson with 11:30 left to play and failed on a two-point conversion.

The Raiders managed to get a field goal with 5:49 left and got the ball back with 1:46 left in the game. Culpepper's pass to Ronald Curry was intercepted by Page with 46 seconds left.

"We've got to finish," Culpepper said. "You say you want to get going but once you get going you've go to finish."

Culpepper was 18 for 29 for 228 yards, while Jordan was held to 29 yards on 11 carries as Oakland's running game had problems for a second consecutive week.

Both teams struggled offensively before the game opened up with a few big plays in the second half. Johnson, bottled up early, had a season-long 54-yard run midway through the third quarter. Kansas City couldn't capitalize when Dave Rayner missed a 30-yard field goal that would have put the Chiefs up 9-0.

The Raiders (2-4) immediately seized the momentum, with Culpepper hitting Jerry Porter on a 59-yard pass on the next play. Culpepper followed with a 21-yard scoring strike to Curry, who had dropped three passes earlier in the game, to give Oakland a 7-6 lead. The Raiders had gained only 102 yards before getting 80 on the back-to-back plays.

Early in the fourth quarter, Huard eluded the rush from Warren Sapp on a third-and-10 and flung the ball downfield before Kirk Morrison could hit him. Dwayne Bowe came up with the 58-yard catch to the Oakland 16, setting up Johnson's go-ahead score that made it 12-7.

The Raiders answered with a 37-yard field goal by Sebastian Janikowski with 5:49 left to cut it to 12-10, but couldn't score on their final drive.

The Chiefs scored the only points in an offensive-challenged first half on a pair of field goals by Rayner. The teams combined for 192 yards in the half, getting only 10 first downs.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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