Editorials

Hillary Clinton should be our next president

Hillary Clinton is the presidential candidate who is by far the most qualified, most prepared, most thoughtful, most experienced and most deserving of Americans’ votes.
Hillary Clinton is the presidential candidate who is by far the most qualified, most prepared, most thoughtful, most experienced and most deserving of Americans’ votes. The Associated Press

We make no apologies for endorsing Hillary Clinton for president. Of the two major candidates and all the minor-leaguers, she is by far the most qualified, most prepared, most thoughtful, most experienced and most deserving of our votes. That doesn’t mean we don’t have concerns.

What doesn’t concern us, though, are her ideas, qualifications and demeanor. Throughout this campaign, the debates and vicious internet attacks, she has shown that she has what it takes to lead.

Consider her policies. Millionaires won’t like her tax plans much, but the middle class will. So will those still looking for jobs.

She borrowed some of Bernie Sanders’ best ideas, including a debt-free college education and a $15-an-hour minimum wage. She opposes the Trans-Pacific Partnership deal but holds out hope it can be salvaged – and so do we. Clinton would expand the Affordable Care Act and improve mental health treatment. She has always advocated on behalf of poor children.

Donald Trump says climate change is a hoax, denying its role in California’s unprecedented drought, Florida’s ferocious hurricanes and deadly heat waves; Clinton would build on the Paris accord and focus on creating clean energy.

Clinton is no unreconstructed liberal. Her judicial appointees are likely to be middle-of-the-road, except when it comes to Citizens United – which she wants overturned.

On Day One, President Clinton will be a capable and stable commander in chief. It was Clinton who urged President Barack Obama to go into Pakistan to kill Osama bin Laden. And it is Clinton whom Vladimir Putin fears, which is why his evil internet elves are trying to meddle in our election.

Most worrying is the possibility her election will provoke some of the most unstable elements of society to violence. Never has anyone seen such a bitter presidential campaign. We worry some of those vowing to take up arms might not cool off. They must.

We worry, too, that partisan gridlock will worsen. If Republicans maintain control of the Senate, what’s to keep Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell from refusing to consider President Clinton’s Supreme Court nominees?

We worry about outsized expectations – not from the right-wing fringe, but from Clinton’s most ardent fans. When President Obama tried to steer a moderate course in his first two years, liberals grew disenchanted. Will they be similarly frustrated with the first woman in the Oval Office?

Finally, we worry about her penchant for secrecy and unwillingness to engage with the media and the American people. Her changing stories about her email, her speeches to bankers, the connections between the Clinton Foundation and State Department have convinced millions that Clinton is untrustworthy. These were mistakes, not crimes.

Are we worried about her role in the Benghazi attacks? No. It has been investigated eight times by Congress. Candid Republicans have admitted there’s nothing there except tragedy.

Are we worried this will be a continuation of Obama’s presidency? Not at all. Household income has taken its biggest jump in history, unemployment is half what it was in 2008, the stock market has skyrocketed and our economy is the envy of the world.

Are we worried about the 30 years of conspiracy theories – from not knowing how to bake chocolate chip cookies to murdering a lover to trying to intimidate a philandering husband’s playmates? Just because talk-radio blowhards repeat them ad nauseam doesn’t make them true.

For all his disqualifying faults, Trump is more charismatic than Clinton. But he’s also a racist, clinically narcissistic, a liar, a cheat (according to lawsuits), a misogynist and a bully. He’s not worthy of any public office.

Clinton, by contrast, can be as dull as a suburban grandmother. But she’s also tough enough to stand up to Putin, Bashar Assad or any other enemy. She’s smart enough, and compassionate enough, to lead. That’s the kind of president we need. No apologies necessary.

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