Turlock

GM will retire from one of Stanislaus County’s largest water and power providers

Casey Hashimoto, general manager of the Turlock Irrigation District since 2010, announced on April 9, 2019, that he will retire at the end of the year.
Casey Hashimoto, general manager of the Turlock Irrigation District since 2010, announced on April 9, 2019, that he will retire at the end of the year. Turlock Irrigation District

Casey Hashimoto, general manager of the Turlock Irrigation District since 2010, announced Tuesday that he will retire at the end of 2019.

The leader of one of Stanislaus County’s largest water and power providers disclosed his plans at the morning board meeting. Hashimoto, an electrical engineer, joined TID in 1985 and was an assistant GM for 10 years.

“Casey has provided TID impeccable leadership in his nine years as general manager,” board president Charlie Fernandes said in a news release. “He navigated the district through difficult transitions in both the water and energy industries all while keeping a watchful eye on the bottom line. He will be greatly be missed.”

The district is launching the search for a successor to Hashimoto, who, according to transparentcalifornia.com, made 228,679.50 in 2016. TID employs 454 people.

The district provides Tuolumne River water to about 150,000 acres of farmland roughly bounded by the Tuolumne, Merced and San Joaquin rivers and the Hickman and Ballico areas.

The 100,00-plus power customers are in that zone and in areas stretching east to La Grange and west to Diablo Grande.

Electricity rates have been relatively stable as TID dealt with renewable energy mandates and other challenges in the industry. The district’s power mix includes natural gas, wind and solar along with its longtime hydroelectric generation at Don Pedro Reservoir.

TID has joined in recent years to fight state proposals for increased fishery flows on the Tuolumne, Stanislaus and Merced rivers. It also is working with the cities of Turlock and Ceres on a river treatment plant supplementing city wells. The Modesto Irrigation District has done that north of the river for a quarter-century.

Hashimoto grew up on a Winton-area farm that produced almonds, peaches and grapes. Before joining TID, he worked in processing and other jobs for the Livingston Farmers Association.

Hashimoto has a bachelor’s degree in fruit science from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, and is licensed as an engineer by the state.

He was named interim GM in August 2010 and got the permanent job the next March.

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