High School Athletes of the Week

For the week of January 8, 2009

01/08/2009 2:47 AM

01/08/2009 3:01 AM

Outstanding prep athletes for the week of January 8, 2009.

Large Schools

TORI SELESIA
Sonora basketball

After spending the first month of the season as a role player for the Wildcats, Selesia gave coach Lloyd Longeway a glimpse of her scoring potential when she scored 32 points in a 56-41 win over Central Valley. The 5-foot-5-inch junior guard hit 16 of 19 shots from the floor, and finished with eight rebounds and six steals.

"Tori plays a wing and her speed makes her tough to defend," Longeway said. "Her role will be to play good defense and look to attack opponents with her quickness."

Selesia had 10 points, four rebounds and two steals in a 49-45 loss to Pitman last week.

"One of her biggest improvements this year is her ability to play under control physically and mentally," Longeway said. "She plays a shooting guard and is a weapon defensively and offensively with her quick feet and competitive spirit."

CHRISTIAN WILLIAMS
Sierra basketball

Williams was one of the Stanislaus District's top guards a year ago, spreading the ball among teammates and hitting perimeter shots when he wasn't driving to the basket.

Graduation hit the T'wolves hard, however, and Williams is now the team's primary scorer as well as its top ballhandler. He averaged 26 points at the Columbia tournament, leading Sierra to three wins and a title. He also had eight rebounds, four assists and three steals per game — including 28 points, 10 rebounds and three steals to beat Downey 50-38 in the final.

"He's physically stronger after working hard in the offseason," said coach Scott Thomason, whose 6-foot-1-inch senior shoots 44 percent (29 of 66) from 3-point range. "Last year he was in the low 30-percent range. He's become a big-time scorer this year, able to hit from anywhere."

Small Schools

SKYE DOMINGUEZ
Ripon basketball

When Dominguez takes a pass under the basket, she's often looking up at a defender — not a surprising situation for a 5-foot-8-inch post player whose job it is to provide the Indians with an inside scoring threat. Fortunately, basketball isn't just about how tall you are.

"Skye's role on the team is to score in the paint," coach George Contente said. "She is very quick, she leaps very well. One of her best assets is toughness. She plays through pain, does not back down from anybody and is fearless when she attacks the basket."

Dominguez averaged 14.5 points, four rebounds and 4.5 steals in losses to Fortuna (which is 12-1) and large-school Redwood of Larkspur.

"Her biggest improvement is defense. She can guard bigger post players, is quicker than smaller post players and can steal the ball," Contente said.

FELIX MAPANDA
Patterson basketball

It was rare indeed to see Mapanda straying too far from the hoop last season. With a limited offensive repertoire, he was best used inside to score points and grab rebounds. The 6-foot-5-inch center spent the summer working on his game, coach Tony Lomeli said, and it's clear he is now comfortable anywhere on the floor.

"Felix has vastly improved his game to become a more complete player," Lomeli said. "He has improved his outside shooting and has become one of our best ball handlers and defenders."

Mapanda averaged 20 points, 11 rebounds, 3.5 steals, four assists and three blocked shots in last week's wins over Linden and Atwater.

"One of the assets Felix brings to our team is his work ethic and willingness to improve," Lomeli said. "This has rubbed off on others on the team."

— RICHARD T. ESTRADA

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