Editorials

May 11, 2014

Our View: Graduates must stay sober if driving

Graduations are rites of passage, the culmination of years of hard work, dedication and mental effort. Hence, graduation parties are seen as times to let loose, kick back and celebrate – often with an adult beverage.

Mother’s Day has just passed, so graduation is just around the proverbial corner. So is a cop.

Graduations are rites of passage, the culmination of years of hard work, dedication and mental effort. Hence, graduation parties are seen as times to let loose, kick back and celebrate – often with an adult beverage.

If you’re a college graduate, having too many of those might be ill-advised, but it is entirely legal. If you’re a high school graduate, that adult beverage is both ill-advised and entirely illegal.

As the parent of a recent graduate, the dumbest thing you can possibly do is provide alcohol to a teenager. Providing your teen, or her friend, a good-luck libation could spell their death. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says a third of all fatal crashes for underage drivers involve alcohol. From the months of April to June, it’s worse; that’s when 36 percent of all fatalities involving under-21 drinking drivers occur.

Death is the ultimate penalty. But teens drivers should know that even taking a sip or two can cost them their license for an entire year. Driving with a blood-alcohol limit of 0.04 – half the legal limit for adults – can result in a loss of the driver’s license for 12 months for someone under 21. Is it worth it?

Many high schools will host the “Every 15 Minutes” program in the next few weeks. It’s effective.

Being killed in an accident is tragic and is the worst thing that can happen. But it’s not the only bad thing that can happen.

Don’t forget. Those graduation parties are just around the corner and so are the cops.

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