Editorials

September 10, 2013

Our View: On 9/11, we remember

Twelve years after the fact, that horrific day we simply know as 9/11 remains a vivid and painful memory to most Americans.

Twelve years after the fact, that horrific day we simply know as 9/11 remains a vivid and painful memory to most Americans.

On 9/11, we honor and remember the nearly 3,000 people who died at the World Trade Center in New York City, at the Pentagon and aboard United Airlines Flight 93, which crashed into a field in Pennsylvania. Today’s high school students may or may not recall the day and how much it changed life here in the U.S. Future generations will have to be taught about the terrorist attacks and their significance in our history. We wish for a day that terrorism would only be a subject of history, but that seems naive in our current world.

Some observances are planned today, such as a memorial parade in Merced, but not as many as were held in the years immediately following the attacks. But that doesn’t mean the country will or can forget.

The 9/11 Memorial has become one of the most visited locations in New York City and more people will have a chance to learn about 9/11 when the adjoining Memorial Museum opens at the World Trade Center site next year.

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