What happens to U.S. exports already bound for Russia?

08/08/2014 2:50 AM

08/09/2014 3:16 PM

The U.S. Department of Agriculture and its plant health inspection service has halted all certification of almonds and other commodities bound for Russia “effective immediately.”

The move Thursday, confirmed by California almond growers, followed Russia’s imposition of a one-year ban on a wide range of agriculture products, raw materials and food coming from the United States, the European Union, Canada, Norway and Australia.

While Russia has banned most U.S. farm products, it’s not clear what happens to goods that were already in the pipeline.

“At this time, the Almond Board of California is not aware of how consignments already in transit or now arriving in Russia will be handled,” the group said in a statement shared with McClatchy. “Year to date, shipments to Russia represent about 3 percent of total California almond exports.”

Russia imported about 23,500 tons of U.S. almonds last year, most from California, valued at $126 million.

“We look forward to working again with our customers in Russia, once the market is reopened,” said Jenny Nicolau, the board’s senior specialist for industry relations. “The Almond Board will continue to monitor the situation, working closely with US government.”

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