FILE - In this Tuesday, Oct. 10, 2017 file photo, people walk past a fallen transformer and downed power lines on Parker Hill Road in Santa Rosa, Calif. The wildfires that damaged much of remote Northern California areas, crippling cell phones, landlines and internet leads some to believe that old-fashioned sirens and ham radios might be more reliable in a disaster.
FILE - In this Tuesday, Oct. 10, 2017 file photo, people walk past a fallen transformer and downed power lines on Parker Hill Road in Santa Rosa, Calif. The wildfires that damaged much of remote Northern California areas, crippling cell phones, landlines and internet leads some to believe that old-fashioned sirens and ham radios might be more reliable in a disaster. San Jose Mercury News via AP, File Nhat V. Meyer
FILE - In this Tuesday, Oct. 10, 2017 file photo, people walk past a fallen transformer and downed power lines on Parker Hill Road in Santa Rosa, Calif. The wildfires that damaged much of remote Northern California areas, crippling cell phones, landlines and internet leads some to believe that old-fashioned sirens and ham radios might be more reliable in a disaster. San Jose Mercury News via AP, File Nhat V. Meyer

PG&E says someone else's wires may have started deadly blaze

November 10, 2017 10:30 AM

UPDATED November 10, 2017 12:02 PM

More Videos

  • These machines hope to reduce dust during almond harvesting in the Central Valley

    Gabriele Ludwig, director or sustainability and environmental affairs with the Almond Board of California, explains the issues related to dust during the harvest season. At the Van Duyn Family Farms in Escalon on Tuesday, three companies – Exact Harvesting Systems, Flory and Jack Rabbit – showed off their machinery that reduces dust.