FILE - In this Nov. 2, 2017 file photo, musician Sam Smith poses for a portrait in New York to promote his album, "The Thrill of It All." A study of hundreds of thousands of popular songs over the last three decades has found a downward sonic trend in happiness and an increase in sadness. Some songs with a low happiness index in 2014 include “Stay With Me” by Smith.
FILE - In this Nov. 2, 2017 file photo, musician Sam Smith poses for a portrait in New York to promote his album, "The Thrill of It All." A study of hundreds of thousands of popular songs over the last three decades has found a downward sonic trend in happiness and an increase in sadness. Some songs with a low happiness index in 2014 include “Stay With Me” by Smith. AP, File Photo by Victoria Will/Invision
FILE - In this Nov. 2, 2017 file photo, musician Sam Smith poses for a portrait in New York to promote his album, "The Thrill of It All." A study of hundreds of thousands of popular songs over the last three decades has found a downward sonic trend in happiness and an increase in sadness. Some songs with a low happiness index in 2014 include “Stay With Me” by Smith. AP, File Photo by Victoria Will/Invision

Singing the blues: Study of pop music finds rise in sadness

May 15, 2018 04:59 PM