WorkWise Q&A, Blog Tip: New to IT, HR, behavior

January 23, 2014 

ONLINE EDUCATION

Q: Dear Culp workwise I am going to an online school. I would like to know how do employers view online schools and do they hire people from an online school, because. I am obtaining my bachelors degree from (one). I am majoring in Web Application, I have 8 classes left to finish. I would like to know how do I get into the IT industry right because I been trying to get into the industry. Also how do I get a job in the industry and how do I find a job in this industry willl still attendind school. Student

A: Dear Student, Your email, which I’ve condensed, reflects the need for help with writing and the basics of job hunting. The status of a school isn’t as important as the ability to communicate clearly. Get help with writing so your thoughts are organized and expressed well.

Budget time for job hunting. Read books and articles related to job-hunting in the industry. Join groups on LinkedIn with like-minded people. Ask them how they landed their first job. Get involved in industry groups. Communicate in person and by telephone as much as you can. Ask people for referrals. Don’t stop. mlc

STRATEGY

Q: Dear Dr. Culp, I have a masters in healthcare administration and I’ve been looking for jobs for about six months. I’m a very dedicated professional, focused to work for healthcare. I’ve been trying all possible ways discussed in one of your articles, without success. Additionally, I’ve offered to volunteer at several places. I’m currently volunteering at two hospitals.

When I contact some of the HR people regarding positions, they say that I don’t have the required experience. Some say that I’m overqualified. I don’t understand how to find a balance between these and answer their questions. Some of them don’t even consider my volunteer experience. My personal goal was to gain experience and contribute to health care. However, I don’t see it going anywhere and I find time is just passing. Blocked

A: Dear Blocked, You’re relying too much on HR and announced positions. Approach employers in departments where you’d like to work. Ask those who don’t hire you when you might recontact them.

“Overqualified” and “underqualified” are code for “I’m not going to hire you.”

You still might learn something helpful if you ask which types of jobs in their organizations they’d recommend.

Employers have new budgets. Expand your search. mlc

BLOG TIP: QUIRKINESS

Where do you draw the line between creativity and eccentricity? Both attract attention. Both make a person stand out. One may be standard behavior with a flair, while the other isn’t. Tyron Giuliani has recruited globally from Tokyo for 13 years (optiapartners.com). In that amount of time, he’s heard a lot about how some candidates behaved en route to interviews or in them.

The British president of a leading international promotional firm received a shoe from a candidate, complete with a motivating hint. “On the shoe the candidate had written a note,” Giuliana recalls. “‘Now that I have one “foot” in the door, can I get the other in?’” Open sesame!

A Fortune 500 company selling rubber products and pens was recruiting a CFO. The Australian conducting the interview, a regional CFO, stood up to ask questions, then “started to rub his back against the window frame on the meeting-room wall,” Giuliana relates. “It was like watching an elephant scratch itself against a tree.”

The interviewer then walked back to his chair, sat down and acted as if his behavior were standard interviewing fare. “The job-seeking CFO just went along with it but emailed me later asking if it were normal,” Giuliana comments.

Mildred Culp welcomes your questions at culp@workwise.net.

Modesto Bee is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere in the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

Commenting FAQs | Terms of Service